Putting the Customer First: Audi responds to the TT Window Regulator issue

TT-window-regulator-fix

Back in February, we published a running report on our own Audi TT 2.0 TFSi which focused on a problem that had blighted our enjoyment of the car – namely the driver or passenger window becoming ‘stuck’ half open.

Some owners experience warning signs prior to the failure (a graunching noise or slowness when raising the window), and it usually affects one door window at a time (usually the driver’s door first). Either way, it seems to happen at the most inconvenient moments.

After our less than helpful experience with our local Audi dealer, Vindis of Huntingdon, I decided to fix the problem myself and in doing so discovered that it was caused by a strand of window regulator cable breaking and getting stuck in the pulley system.

SEE ALSO: Final Report: Audi TT 2.0 TFSi – window regulator problems solved!

AudiTT running report I3 Putting the Customer First: Audi responds to the TT Window Regulator issueThat graunching sound you hear is the frayed cable trying to pass through this plastic pulley.

It seemed obvious this was a design failure, rather than wear-and-tear, so I contacted Audi UK to find out how they were handling the situation for other TT owners.

During this time, we were contacted by dozens of TT owners who’d experienced the same issue – one of whom is Richard Illingworth, a UK customer who moved to Ireland before his window regulator failure occurred. You can read his story below.

What did we learn?

TT window regulator fix G2 684x424 Putting the Customer First: Audi responds to the TT Window Regulator issue

After Audi read about the problem here on SkiddMark, they went away and performed a thorough investigation by data mining their internal systems.

Rob McDonald from Audi UK’s Customer Service team confirmed that the issue was not showing up as a significant complaint on their warranty system, but he was able to notice the volume of complaints being higher on 2007/08 cars.

Dissatisfied with his initial finding, Rob then reviewed the parts inventory to compare warranty claims against parts ordered. He found an unusually high number of parts being ordered compared to those fitted by dealers, which led him to believe that many were being fitted by customers (as I did) or by independent garages – hence falling outside the warranty net.

He also discovered that the window regulator part itself had been upgraded twice in the past 3 to 4 years, which may have been due to the factory or component supplier spotting a weakness and applying a fix. Either way, it bodes well for the improved reliability of newer TTs and of course now that Audi has performed this investigation, there will be a record on the warranty system that dealers can use to guide their own investigations.

Our advice to owners

If you own an Audi TT (or in fact any Audi model) and come across an unusual problem such as this, the first thing you should do is obviously to contact your dealer. Sometime dealers are unable to recognise trends, since you may be the first person reporting it, so in that case it’s important that you contact Audi Customer Services (see below) and let then know of the issue.

This advice was also re-iterated in an official statement received from Audi last night.

The concept of trouble free motoring is a myth – cars are complex machines, car makers use millions of parts across their range and customers will always have a role to play in the long-term testing and improvement of the components fitted. The issue is not whether a car will go wrong, but how well the after-sales process supports the customer when a problem occurs.

I am confident after speaking with Audi that this window regulator problem is now logged on their system as a ‘known issue’, but they still need your help.

Thus far the problem seems to affect early Mk2 TT models, but that may just be a factor of age, and the problem may still exist on newer cars. To help Audi complete their diagnosis, contact the Audi Customer Service team and let them know if you are experiencing the problem, or have recently replaced your window regulator.

As vehicle owners, you are the eyes and ears that provide car makers with the knowledge to improve their products. Audi recognise this as a service to them, and therefore are prepared to make ‘goodwill gestures’ to offset the costs of replacement.

It does, after all, save them money when they can proactively remedy a problem (through design or after sales inspection) rather than end up with a bunch of unhappy customers who switch their loyalty to another brand.

There are exceptions to this rule, as we highlight below.

Customer Case Study: Richard Illingworth

richard illingworth Putting the Customer First: Audi responds to the TT Window Regulator issue Richard has kept us updated throughout his ordeal, which first occurred to his November 2008 Audi TT at the beginning of May.

The initial problem Richard faced was finding out ‘who owned his complaint’. As a UK citizen, who bought his car in the UK, but then relocated to Dublin, Ireland, he found himself in no-man’s land. Audi Ireland said that being a UK supplier car it was not their problem. Audi UK said that in order to discuss compensation, he would have to get the car back to a UK Dealer (at his own cost).

Unhappy with his treatment, Richard then contacted the Audi Customer Services team in Ingolstadt, Germany who advised him to speak with the Customer Care Team at Volkswagen Group Ireland Limited.

Volkswagen Group Ireland said that since the manufacturers 2-year warranty had long since expired, there was nothing they could do, but sought to reassure Richard that all repairs comes with a 2-year parts warranty, which they hoped would offer some peace of mind going forward.

Richard’s local dealer, Audi Dublin then took pity on him, offering a €115 ‘goodwill’ deduction from the €465 repair bill. This came out of Audi Dublin’s pocket after Audi Ireland refused to accept responsibility.

Richard has been trading emails with Audi (and VW) for the last 3 weeks, but thankfully his car is now fixed. However, his confidence in Audi’s after-sales support is at an all-time low. Let’s hope Richard is one of the last to experience this treatment and that we’ve now turned a corner in Audi’s understanding of the issue.

* * *

Many thanks to: Rob McDonald, Jon Zammett, Robin Davies and David Ingram of Audi UK. You can reach the Audi UK Customer Services team by calling 0800 699888 or emailing customer.services@audi.co.uk. Please quote your name, address and car registration in any email correspondence.

Further updates

      • Pamela

        Hi Steve, I have the same problem with my Audi TT and I have just spoke to customer services and they told me that it wasn’t a recognised design fault and it was wear and tear. Any help gratefully received. Pamela

        • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

          Hi Pamela, could you send me an email with a bit of background and I will then help escalate to customer services. It’s probably a genuine mistake, perhaps by someone new to the job. There’s no question of it being a design fault – wear and tear does not lead to such a failure and therefore Audi should be willing to lend a hand and ease your frustration.

          You can reach me at steve [at] fitchmedia [dot] com

          • Pamela

            Hi Steve, I’ve sent through an email hope you’ve received it. If you need any more information just let me know. Thanks Pamela.

  • Anu

    Hi Steve,
    Thank you for your informative article. I have experienced the same problem with my Audi TT and given the advice above from Jon Zammett I contacted customer service on the number provided. They were not helpful. I was told that this is not a known issue, ‘no where near the number’ to make it an issue and that it was up to the dealership to charge what they wanted for the repair (I was quoted £580 initially, which then that came down to £497). When i asked what i should expect to pay given that this is a known issue the customer services representative reiterated that it is NOT an issue and that I should tell the garage to offer me a goodwill gesture since I have always service my car there. He also said in no uncertain terms that this is not an Audi problem! Any help would be much appreciated.

  • Anu

    Hi Steve,
    Thank you for your informative article. I have experienced the same problem with my Audi TT and given the advice above from Jon Zammett I contacted customer service on the number provided. They were not helpful. I was told that this is not a known issue, ‘no where near the number’ to make it an issue and that it was up to the dealership to charge what they wanted for the repair (I was quoted £580 initially, which then came down to £497). When I asked what I should expect to pay given that this is a known issue the customer services representative reiterated that it is NOT an issue and that I should tell the garage to offer me a goodwill gesture since I have always service my car there. He also said in no uncertain terms that this is not an Audi problem! Any help would be much appreciated.

  • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

    Hi Anu, I got in touch with both Audi Customer Services and Jon Zammett’s comms and PR team recently after another owner experienced the same ‘shrug of the shoulders’ when going through official channels.

    Looks like it’s time to spread the news that Audi really don’t care about their customers. I was assured by Jon that this issue had been resolved and I spoke with Cust Services at the same time as they ‘logged’ the fault as a ‘known issue’.

    To find they are now repeatedly failing to live up to this promise shows either extreme ineptitude or, perhaps more worrying, a conscious decision to exploit the ignorance of existing customers.

    If you know of any other owners who’d like to be heard, then ask them to contact me (via the feedback form on this page) and/or post their concerns in the comments – I’d like to demonstrate that this remains a real issue for Audi TT owners and not merely limited to 20 or 30 cars.

  • Jussi

    In Finland this is also common problem. I contacted finnish Audi importer and they said that this is NOT known issue. WTF…? All mk2 Audi TT I know so far have had this same problem and its not common? :D
    We need to do something together!

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Hi Jussi, I will speak (again!) to Audi and see how they’d like to play this. The last thing I want is to blow it all out of proportion, but as far as I understand (from my experience and of other owners), every Mk2 Audi TT will at some point experience this problem.

      I don’t believe it is serious enough for a recall, however it should be logged on Audi’s support database and handled by each Customer Service territory as a KNOWN ISSUE!

      I’ll update this post with the outcome..

  • Steve

    Just to add my experience – Audi offered a small discount to the repair. I sent a follow up letter to voice my dissatisfaction at the idea that a window that is never used should have this fault and the lady claimed that it wasn’t a common fault and that it was just wear and tear.

    • Steve

      Oh and to add a bit of further interest, I use a wheelchair and enter/exit the car through the rear (generally). This means that the driver’s door (which is the one with the knackered window) has been used ~50% less, yet still failed after 5 years (which seems to be the pattern here).

      • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

        Thanks for sharing that insight Steve. I can confirm that Audi ‘do know’ about the issue and from repairing it on the car we run I can also confirm that it is NOT wear and tear.

        I will reach out to Audi today and thereafter it sounds like it might be time to revisit this issue in a new article.

  • Adrian

    Same problem just happened to our 5 yr old tt. We live in London and don’t even have a driveway so hopefully will still be there in the morning. Did you get any joy with Audi in the end or should I resign myself to a big bill?

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Sorry to hear about that Adrian, as I’ve said before it’s inevitable and despite Audi CS & PR agreeing this with us, it seems they have failed to operationalise this within the front-line customer service teams.

      Both departments are adopting a ‘head-in-the-sand’ approach – despite contacting and speaking to them several times – so they’re clearly hoping they can ride this one out and leave *customers* to fend for themselves.

      Interestingly, my mother’s A2 has just failed in a similar way (albeit hers is a much older car), but it’s worth noting that Audi are the only car maker where we’ve experienced this problem.

      So for anyone weighing up the pros and cons against a rival brand, make sure you bear this in mind.

  • Dan

    Steve, what makes you think this is linked to Audi TT’s?
    This has happened on all of my VAG cars. First on my 1999 Golf TDI (drivers), both sides went on my 2002 MK1 TT and my MK5 GTI (drivers) was showing signs of failure.

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Hi Dan, yes you’re quite right, the problem won’t be unique to the TT.
      VAG were one of the first car makers to adopt cable-operated gear change and
      electric window mechanisms and most of the time the approach works well.

      As with every other manufacturer they lab test these mechanisms to simulate
      a lifetime of use, but inevitable ‘the lab’ is only a simulation of the real
      word. In the real world the TT’s frameless windows get pretty filthy
      (beneath the window frame) and I noticed this added extra stress to the
      regulator mechanism.

      Ultimately there are two possible points of failure – the regulator motor
      and the pulley system which enables the motor to raise and lower the
      window.

      If the dozens of failures we’ve discovered were purely down to ‘user error’
      I would expect to hear of burned out motors, but in every case (so far) it’s
      the cable which frays and fouls the pulley system, which leads me to conclude
      that it was not up to standard – since it would be reasonable to expect the
      lifetime of the vehicle to be longer than 3 years.

      An electric window mechanism ‘should not’ be seen as a consumable (although
      it will require servicing during the life of the car) – but if VAG do secretly
      believe this is the case then they should make this clear to customers before
      they buy their cars. Dropping this news on customers once their warranty
      runs out is not good form..

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Hi Dan, yes you’re quite right, the problem won’t be unique to the TT.
      VAG were one of the first car makers to adopt cable-operated gear change and
      electric window mechanisms and most of the time the approach works well.

      As with every other manufacturer they lab test these mechanisms to simulate
      a lifetime of use, but inevitable ‘the lab’ is only a simulation of the real
      word. In the real world the TT’s frameless windows get pretty filthy
      (beneath the window frame) and I noticed this added extra stress to the
      regulator mechanism.

      Ultimately there are two possible points of failure – the regulator motor
      and the pulley system which enables the motor to raise and lower the
      window. The TT has a particularly shallow arrangement (because of the depth of the door panel) and therefore seems to place greater strain on the perpendicular turns of the mechanism.

      If the dozens of failures we’ve discovered were purely down to ‘user error’
      I would expect to hear of burned out motors, but in every case (so far) it’s
      the cable which frays and fouls the pulley system, which leads me to conclude
      that it was not up to standard – since it would be reasonable to expect the
      lifetime of the vehicle to be longer than 3 years.

      An electric window mechanism ‘should not’ be seen as a consumable (although
      it will require servicing during the life of the car) – but if VAG do secretly
      believe this is the case then they should make this clear to customers before
      they buy their cars. Dropping this news on customers once their warranty
      runs out is not good form..

  • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

    I am currently speaking about this issue with Craig Westwood, Customer Relations Manager at Audi UK, so will let you all know if we manage to agree a solution which makes the window regulator failure on Mk2 TTs a little bit less painful to experience.

    I am naturally somewhat sceptical from what I’ve seen so far, but perhaps we’re reaching a turning point. Watch this space..

  • MQuinn

    I have a 2008 2.0 TT bought at Audi Perth. Last year the passenger window broke in exactly this fashion. £283 to repair at audi Glasgow. Just tonight the driver window has done the same thing, incidentally the day it started snowing in central Scotland. I shall now need to take this back to Audi glasgow and have it out with them once again. I merely wish to note this in the hoe Audi start to recognise the problem as a design fault, not wear and tear thereby takeing the vehicle out with the requirements of the sale of goods act 1979 and would entitle all customers to have this fault rectified without charge, whether under warranty or not.

    I’m sure you all agree that for a £30k motor this is entirely unacceptable, in terms of vehicle build, customer service and legal accountability.

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Hi Marc, sorry to hear about your car – it sounds about the right age of vehicle for this particular issue. Audi got in touch with me again last week and say they are ‘looking into it’.

      I totally agree that it’s a design/production fault – just imagine the TT sales brochure if it said *please note the electronic window mechanism will only last up to 3 years.

      Ironically Audi has just announced that 2012 has been its best year ever (for US markets) – sales were up 24% compared to the same time last year, and November was 23rd consecutive month of year-over-year gains.

      Yay!! Doesn’t that just make you feel warm all over? Oh, hang on, you’re a customer.

      We’ll be watching closely to see if Audi celebrate customer service wins as loudly as sales wins..

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  • Mark George

    Hi Steve, Our late 2007 21K TT has just suffered the same issue with the passenger window, when I spoke to my local Audi centre they said it was not a known problem, just natural wear and tear for a relatively old car… Mmmm! the passenger seat of this car is hardly ever used and from a mileage perspective the car is not old. As we are just contemplating our next family car purchase, this kind of response makes me think that Audi should not benefit from our custom next time around.

    Regards, Mark.

    • Mark George

      Addendum to yesterdays post:

      I have spoken to Audi PR as you suggest, who rather unfortunately have a vey different perspective on this and are very, very clear in expressing it:

      ‘John Zammett is quoted here, but this is spurious as no problem exists with the regulators and he is miss quoted. They do not follow forums and only work on data from the dealer network. They told me to take my car to a dealer and IF they think it appropriate some level of goodwill offset may be applied.’

      Which of course ties me into potentially substantial dealer costs. Audi do not appear to be concerned about the issues this type of failure cases the cars user, especially as it completely compromises the cars security and leaves the car open to the elements. The use of mild steel in the cable is a very poor engineering choice, which will only save a peppercorn in costs during assembly, but must reap huge financial rewards for the dealer network, corrosion enduced failures must have been foreseen with this assembly in the TT doors damp environment and could probably be predicted to begin post warranty. I have to wonder if this is clearly just a cynical business choice!

      Regards, Mark.

      • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

        Mark, I can assure you that John Z is ‘not’ mis-quoted. I spoke at length with Audi CS when we first diagnosed there was a problem, it didn’t show up in the dealer service records, but it did show up when we reviewed the archive of parts being ordered. We also discovered that the part itself had been updated ‘three’ times in the interim, which shows that the folks in Ingolstadt were well aware of the problem.

        John’s carefully worded email to me (above) was in recognition that a problem had arisen – without admitting blame – and I left it with him to ensure Audi CS were aware and would handle it on a case by case basis.

        You can judge ‘how well’ the situation has been handled by the comments here on SkiddMark.

  • slick

    I have an 07 TT 3.2 automatic with 40k miles on the clock. Last year, the driver side one went and was fixed by Audi Bradford under extended warranty. Said warranty expired in November, and guess what, the passenger side one has just gone >:|

    Looking to buy a part from a breaker and get a local garage to fix it as I’m not lining audi’s pockets any more over this one.

  • slick

    Steve > any advice on how easy this is to fix myself? The father in law was a mechanic and if I can get the part from a breakers, does he need any special tools to fix this?

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Si, sorry for the delay in getting back to you – I personally wouldn’t buy the part from a breakers yard and I’ll tell you the reason why. When you examine the window regulator there’s nothing obviously wrong with it and yet the part number has changed several times during the past few years.

      This led us to conclude (in conversation with Audi CS) that Audi AG know about a problem and have been revising the spec accordingly, therefore it would be reasonable to assume that more recent cars won’t suffer from these same failures.

      The cars I’ve come across have all been just-under or (mainly) over 3 years old, so it doesn’t make sense fitting an old part which Audi (or their OEM supplier) has since improved. For the sake of £130+ or so you might as well fix it for good, especially since the job takes a good 4-5 hours at least. It’s not a difficult job per se, just an unfamiliar one for most of us, so you spend most of the time tip toeing around the fitment trying to avoid breaking anything else. If you’re planning on keeping your TT, then you’ll not want to repeat the same job twice.

      The other factor, and I realise this probably sticks in your throat a bit, is as people fix their cars ‘off radar’ Audi remain ignorant of how much of a problem the window regulator mechanism on the TT can be.

      During my initial conversations, Audi denied there was any problem, because they were tracking the jobs performed by ‘approved’ service agents. When we dug a little deeper we discovered that the parts supply was disproportionate to the number of service jobs performed by agents, which means customers (or 3rd party garages) were buying the part and fitting it themselves. This completely slipped past Audi’s attention. If customers like yourself take this further and fix their cars using second-hand parts, then Audi will be completely in the dark and the ‘cycle of ignorance’ will be complete..

      I can understand how difficult it is to keep on top of these issue, from Audi’s perspective, what I’m none to impressed by is what they do when people like ourselves bring it to their attention (see no evil – hear no evil – speak no evil)

      http://skiddmark.com/wp-content/themes/bootstrap/assets/img/see-no-evil.jpg

  • tom

    Just as it snows and turns minus 5, drivers window stuck 3/4 down!! 59 plate with 13k on the clock. ridiculous.

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      59 plate, so is that still within warranty? Yours is also one of the newest we’ve heard of and suggests the problem might not have been solved in more recent cars. There’s no way it can be reasoned that a car with 13,000 miles should fail due to ‘wear and tear’.

      Audi, you really need to act ‘pro-actively’ and show your customers that you individually give a damn..

  • Andy

    Passenger side window on a 2008 TT failed last summer, had it replaced at a local independent garage – £350 bill. End of last year, both external door handles failed (could only open doors from inside) – £400 bill from an Audi dealer. Now the drivers side window is making the dreaded graunching noise!! Not sure whether to try going through Audi to argue the toss re: known issue, or go to an independent who will probably be cheaper. Audi TT is a great car to look at and drive, but hell they need to sort out the doors / customer service!!

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Andy, I’m going to pass your comment directly on to Audi. I agree with you, the TT is otherwise a great car to own – we still have ours (it’s now covered nearly 70k miles) but I’ve found Audi the ‘least’ customer-oriented company I’ve bought a car from in 20 years.

      I’ve told them, but they clearly aren’t concerned, which is a shame – If I were a shareholder I’d be calling for heads to roll – I’ve been contacted by dozens of people who’ll no longer buy an Audi because of the way they’ve been treated.

      I see a number of brands make this mistake, as sales numbers increase they see it as a sign of their own increasing status, rather than a greater burden of responsibility to maintain standards across a wider customer base.

      In my line of work I usually get called in to sort a company out ‘after’ they’ve screwed up, prior to this they nearly always believe they can do no wrong.

      • brian

        wow – same issues exactly with my 08 TT. First of all the passenger window stuck and needed the regulator replacing and this morning both the drivers and passenger doors would not open with the exterior door handles. I had to ask my daughter to climb in through the tailgate to open from the inside! the doors now appear to have corrected themselves but I have zero confidence in it remaining this way. For a great car, these fittings appear to be a ‘Friday afternoon’ job taht lets the whole side down.

        • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

          Brian, the door mechanism is on a separate circuit to the window regulator, but it sounds like your central locking mechanism had a brain freeze. If it happens again, then the best thing would be to take it into your Audi dealer and ask them to plug it in (to read the central ECU). There might be an error code they can pick up which will help them pin point the cause.

          As far as I know there’s no inherent issue with the TT’s central locking, so I’d recommend treating it as a one-off.

          • brian

            Hi Steve – I progressed the investigations a little further this morning.

            Once again, both doors were jammed shut but, as I had previously only witnessed the issue with the driver’s door I tried another approach on the passenger side. Due to the extreme cold temperatures and a slight issue with the door seal since I had my electric window regulator replaced late last year, it appears that the passenger door had managed to freeze shut. I pushed on the door a few times to release the seal and it opened fine.

            The driver’s side remained an issue and had to be opened from the inside. Once I was in, it started working fine again but I suspect the issue will reoccur on the drivers side, as this seems to be getting more frequent recently. I have seen another forum posting that suggested greasing the catch as this sometime sticks so I’ll try that and let the forum know if I have any success on that front. As its intermittent and I don’t want to damage anything I am avoiding taking the door trim off for now.

          • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

            Glad to see you’ve made some headway Brian, our car is always garaged overnight, so perhaps it’s a water ingress problem caused by rapidly cooling damp air?

            I wonder if a PTFE lubricant might be the solution, because even grease can become sticky – a good PTFE product such as Valvoline’s High Pressure Lubricant operates across a wide range of temperatures from -50 degrees C to +250 degrees.

            I usually only use grease in areas where heat naturally builds (i.e. moving parts), whereas on a door handle (or joint) an anti-friction product would probably be more effective. http://www.tredz.co.uk/.WD40-Ptfe-Anti-Friction-Dry-Lube_54810.htm?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=AdwordsProductAds&utm_campaign=Adwords&gclid=CP6Lmoae97UCFcbKtAodAgMAnw

  • Soft

    Hi Everybody, I just had the same surprise yesterday evening with the passenger side window. I ve just got it fixed today with Audi Edinburgh – £290. The woman admitted that I was not the only one having this issue. And she also said that even latest TT has got the issue. :(.

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Glad to hear you got it fixed (and £290 seems very reasonable). The reason why some of the dealer service people don’t know about the issue is because many people are buying the part and either replacing it themselves, or arranging for an independent dealer to fit it (because often their car is outside warranty).

      It’s a simple case of the left hand not knowing what the right is doing, nevertheless it’s disappointing to see so many people still experiencing the problem.

      Interesting to note your car failed on the passenger side, it’s usually the driver’s side (which gets the most use)

  • Abdullah

    Hello every body,

    I have the same issue for my 2008 Audi TT with window regolater and I have got it fixed at dealer for 350$

    but the didn’t balance the window right, any one have the guidelines on how to do it home cause I got sick with taking appointment for a week!!

  • Fran

    This happened to me on Friday i have a 58 plate Audi TT Quattro

  • Pete

    same story …. my 58 plate TT Quattro stuck down !!! Surely Audi must realise this is a customer satisfaction issue

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      We British often don’t like to complain, but this is precisely why we MUST complain if a genuine injustice is evident. Sometimes the company doesn’t realise it’s an issue (as I believe was true ‘originally’ in this case). I have spoken with Audi several times and originally they were grateful (after a few pokes) of being notified, then their PR process kicked in..

      Many companies still believe they can control their reputation through spin, positive self-promotion and the tried-and-tested head in the sand routine – in this case Audi know you are complaining (I’ve kept them appraised of the number of owners we’ve logged) and have chosen to ‘play the odds’. The odds are you will go away (eventually).

      Meanwhile they redouble their efforts to work with media whom they can influence – which in the automotive world means those who are invited to join their press junkets and who they can therefore agree a quid-pro-qua deal with – we’ll provide you with new cars to drive just so long as you respect ‘the line’ which you must not cross. In one sense you cannot blame them, PR stands for promotion in most respects and journalists are part of their investment in ‘earned media’.

      That’s why in most cases, we (SkiddMark) do not attend press launches – we’ll review cars on our own terms and at our own convenience, not because it suits a particular brand.

      Because of this I’m happy to convey customer satisfaction issues like this, because somebody needs to put the customer/reader first.

  • Rob

    08 plate TT ~ 60,000 miles and drivers window mechanism has gone, currently discussing with Audi UK. Clearly this part is not “fit for purpose” however I assume from everyone’s experience I’m not going to get anywhere with them?

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Rob, I am still awaiting a ‘good news’ story from Audi despite repeatedly asking them for an alternative perspective on what we’ve observed. Now and again issues such as this arise, and despite seeming conclusive, there’s in fact a much larger contingent of owners who’ve never experienced the problem and are quite happy with their cars.

      When I was originally contacted by an Audi spokesperson, we took this into account and as more cases have mounted up, I’ve asked them to clarify if we’re only seeing part of the picture.

      Audi know about this question, are well aware of this article and I can only assume (from their subsequent silence) are hiding a far bigger problem.

      I do believe however that the part concerned has now been improved and no longer represents such a weak link, so Audi are hoping owners will keep quiet, pay to fix their cars and that the problem will eventually go away by itself.

      The experience has certainly stopped me buying another Audi, and I know of many others who’ve chosen to go elsewhere, but Audi are still reporting record sales figures, so as you can imagine they’re not unduly concerned as long as they’re filling the bucket faster than it leaks..

  • Rob

    Also, has anyone actually taken this through the small claims court?

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      We don’t have ‘Lemon’ Laws here in the UK, but even so the law is fairly clear – claims need to be made in the first few months of a car’s lifetime (if a product is truly not fit for purpose), in which case the car maker is given ample opportunity to remedy the problem.

      Thereafter, as time passes the warranty scheme takes precedence and once outside this period (as most of the cars affected clearly are) it’s up to the manufacturer’s discretion what they do about such a problem. Recalls are usually only forthcoming where safety is concerned (due to the liability risk), otherwise you’re on your own. A small claims court would only be of use in suing the dealer who sold the car, and even then, they’d have recourse to claim it was within the standards of the manufacturer provided it had been properly inspected.

      Thereafter you’d need to pursue some form of class-action suit on behalf of a large group of customers, but that would cost more than just replacing the part. Car maker wins with reputation slightly tarnished, but otherwise all in a day’s work..

  • Rob

    So £300 later window fixed! Audi Cardiff were excellent, more than can be said about Audi UK customer services! Twice told that i would be contacted by phone, twice let down, not an impressive response. Thanks for your input Steve and good luck to anyone else dealing with this issue! I’m just waiting for the second window to go now!

  • baz bestford

    hi i have a 07 fsi ,o/s cable rusted and broke.had it fixed.and now the n/s has gone.fitted the o/s myself not to bad to do.but its buying them is costly audi should at least sell them cheaper..baz

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  • Sean

    This doesn’t just affect 2nd generation TTs. My 2001 A4 had the same problem with the cable being chewed up. The picture you have at the top may as well be the one from my car, as the design hasn’t changed, and is a known problem with Audis. I still love Audis though.

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      That’s interesting to know, thanks Sean.

  • GrumpyMark

    Hi All, just started experiencing this issue with my 2007 TT, drivers side door. Grinding noise follwoed by window doing its own thing. thankfully its in closed position at the moment. Im in AUSTRALIA and rand the AUDI hotline who were not very helful, they asked my to take the vehicle to the local dealer – we only have one in Adelaide. I rang and they said they need to do a diagnosis first, didnt admit to the issue and said it might be wear and tear. At $165/hr the diagnosis is non refundable and also doesnt fix tghe issue – just confirms what i already know from the blogs including this one and U-Tube. Can any one let me know how best to get this resolved without spending hundreds to confirm the issue ?? Not happy as the car already had light issues and stone deflector problems as well as it creaks in summer !!!
    cheers
    Mark

  • A.N. Noyed

    My experience. After saving hard to by this car I finally got one and was looking forward to getting behind the wheel. Now 16 months on the road the windows have failed. I was not aware of the issue when I bought the car but 2 weeks ago the passenger side started sounding bad then did not go up all the way. Had a look online that day and discovered a lot of other owners having the same problem. I emailed Audi Customer Services and the automatic reply said they would contact me, 2 days later the drivers side failed, 1 week later no reply from Audi. Took it to my local dealership in Peterborough and the parts guy said they knew that there was a problem, had a look at the car and confirmed it was the regulators, he said he would pass the info on to the warranty guy and he would contact me. Nothing from both the dealership and customer services in 2 weeks. Contacted dealer yesterday and the warranty guy said he knew nothing about it but would look into a goodwill gesture, within 10 minutes he rang back and said there was nothing they could do, 1 hour later I rand parts to ask how much regulators were to buy, he gave the price and said they had lots in stock, no shit as they are always going wrong. For a premium brand the customer services and dealership are shocking to say the least. My previous car was 3 years old when I bought it and I had it for 8 years and there was never a problem with the windows. I will be contacting customer services again and from now on I will not be using Audi for any parts or servicing.

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Unfortunately this resonates with the experience of many other TT owners who’ve contacted us. I have spoken many times with Audi PR, they know about the issue and have assured me they are stepping up support processes to respond.

      If it’s any (small) comfort, we’ve owned our Mk2 TT for almost 7 years and these window regulators are the only unforeseen problem we’ve had. Both of ours failed, but have worked fine in the 2 years since being replaced with the latest (upgraded) part.

      Sadly, I was contacted by an owner last week who was fobbed off by Audi CS, who continue to perpetuate the myth that there’s no issue. They even had the gall to suggest the letter on this page from Audi PR Director Jon Zammett was a ‘hoax’. If anyone experiences a similar rebuttal I will send you the original email for you to share with your dealer or CS rep.

      The problem as I see it resides with Audi Customer Services. Your dealer should respond more sympathetically, especially if you’re a long-term customer, but for owners like yourself who are new to the brand this is a wasteful own-goal. Audi’s cars are (in the main) well built and relatively inexpensive to repair and once you get past this frustrating experience I’m sure you’ll enjoy driving the TT.

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  • Matty Naughton

    I read this post a few weeks ago, emailed Audi UK about my 2007 (6.5 year old car) with a full Audi Service History and MOT. Both my regulators failed within the same week. My local audi centre replaced one for free, I’m delighted! Thanks Steve.

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Brilliant news Matty, glad to hear they responded swiftly. :)

  • Donna Money

    Just experienced the same problem, tt roadster 57 plate. Passenger window (which doesn’t get anywhere near as much wear and tear as driver window) stuck half way up then following attempt to open/shut is now stuck all the way down. Popped in to Audi Tamworth on the way home from work (nearly closing time) and was told that more than likely the regulator, cost around £102 to diagnose the problem, £280 for a new regulator (if it is the reg) and another £102 (hourly charge) to fix. Unfortunately due to only 30 minutes of the working day left it could not be fixed today. If I need to drop it off and use a courtesy car (as need my car to earn funds to pay for the repair) one can be supplied but they do not have any in until the end of the month!!! Car now sat on driveway with window wide open, fingers crossed it’s still there in the morning. I could understand if the mechanism has had a lot of wear but it hasn’t. Unsure as whether to go to Stafford audi where car was originally purchased a couple of years ago or to an independent dealer?

    • http://www.skiddmark.com Steve Davies

      Hi Donna, make sure you use an official Audi Dealer who will be able to make a case to Audi UK for compensation – an independent dealer will not. Also it’s worthwhile ensuring the fault is processed through official channels since this is how car makers learn about any issues with their products. I realise it can be quite a hassle sometimes, but it’s worth persisting.

      In your shoes I would speak with Audi Customer Services by calling 0800 699888 or emailing customer.services@audi.co.uk and ask them to help you find a dealer that can take your car in urgently. They ‘should’ be the best people to help you sort this..

      Make sure they investigate your drivers’ side window at the same time, sometimes the passenger goes first, especially on the roadster, as the window pane gets sticky in its runners due to underuse.

      Let me know how you get on.